Tag Archives: The Space Pirates of Rocquaine

BBC Introducing Guernsey: July 2017 – Chaos, Sark Folk Festival and more

Vice and Track Not Found at the BBC Introducing Guernsey studio

Vice and Track Not Found

Click here to listen to the show

On the July 2017 edition of BBC Introducing in Guernsey we had a festival special of a show with more besides.

For my look back at Chaos Voodoo 13 I spoke to the winners and runners-up of the Chaos/Sound Guernsey Battle of the Bands, VICE and track not found, while hearing music from some of the weekend’s highlight acts.

I also heard from some of the artists who played the Sark Folk Festival including Burg & The Back Porch BandJoe Corbin and Ukuladeez.

On top of that mura masa told us about releasing his self-titled debut album with a special signing at Guernsey’s HMV store and I had a brief look ahead to next month’s Vale Earth Fair.

You can listen to the show by clicking here.

Tracklist

And here’s a new video from The Recks that also came out this month, as a little bonus bit:

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Hattie Briggs, Buff Hudd and Gregory Harrison (and a little Pirating at the Castle) – The Fermain Tavern – 14/07/17

The Space Pirates of Rocquaine at Castle Cornet

The Space Pirates of Rocquaine at Castle Cornet

Every summer Castle Cornet, the medieval castle that stands at the entrance of Guernsey’s harbour, is thrown open on Friday evenings for the Castle Nights events featuring a selection of live music in different areas of the fortification. Before heading up to The Fermain Tavern this evening, I went to the castle to catch The Space Pirates of Rocquaine.

Its been a while since I’ve seen The Space Pirates and they’ve had a bit of a shake up in that time with fiddle player Jess Nash moving into a more part-time capacity (though she did sing a couple of songs tonight) and Nick Dodd joining to add some subtle electric guitar to the mix. Despite this, the general feel of the band’s high energy, fun, rock infused folk remains unchanged and was on fine display.

While the older more well-known songs had a large number of the audience singing along and were the backbone of the set three new songs were included. While the first got a bit lost thanks to sounding like it would need a big sound with lots of harmonies and the likes to be totally effective, the other two continue the band’s style perfectly.

Nick Dodd and Tim Corbett of The Space Pirates of Rocquaine at Castle Cornet

Nick Dodd and Tim Corbett

One, written by mandolin and guitar player Tim Corbett brought a slight country and indie tone while Guppy’s, SS Briseis, was a rabble rousing drinking song, suitable given its subject famously sank with a load of Algerian wine off the island’s coast.

Despite the line up change the band, if anything, felt more focussed and tighter than some past performances and Nick’s guitar added a nice country twang and a slightly different dynamic in places. A few technical issues didn’t seem to faze them and they left the crowd, packed into the castle’s middle ward, calling for more.

You can see a few more of my photos of their set here

After their set I made a swift move up to The Fermain Tavern where a new visitor to the island was playing, alongside a couple of more familiar faces.

Gregory Harrison

Gregory Harrison

Gregory Harrison started the night off in solo mode, without either longtime bass player Nathan or recently added drummer Peter. This provided an interesting contrast to his more recent outings and shone more of a light on his guitar playing and his deeply lovelorn lyrics.

While his performances used to sometimes feel a little mannered it seems his time back in a full band (now he’s in The Recks) has made him more relaxed on stage, giving a new honesty and openness to his songs adding a real passion to his performance along with his deep and rich vocals.

Also flying totally solo tonight was Buffalo Huddleston frontman Buff Hudd. With that in mind he had chosen to expand his sound with a stomp box at one foot and tambourine at the other, along with his didgeridoo and guitar.

Buff Hudd

Buff Hudd

With the audience more focussed and quiet than at many of his gigs (this couldn’t be much more different from his recent outing in The Peace Tent for example) he chose to add an even more intricate side to his playing, or maybe it just came across as more, really showing off his unique skills.

I Don’t Care What You Think About Me added a nice light-hearted touch mid set while Mono-Limb-Tastic did its usual job of wowing the crowd with its ‘one-handed’ style making for a stand out performance for Buff Hudd.

While she had never visited the island before and, as such only drew a small audience, it was clear that Hattie Briggs came highly recommended as a number arriving commented that friends and family in the UK had sung her praises to them.

As soon as she began her performance (backed for a majority of the set by Gregory Harrison on guitar and violin) it was clear why.

Hattie’s songs have a slightly melancholy feel spanning the area between pop, folk and the singer-songwriter movement, with tales of lost love and love never found, amongst other subjects.

Hattie Briggs

Hattie Briggs

What really stood out though was her voice. While there are many good female voices of a similar style doing the rounds something about Briggs went beyond that, leading to more than one to comment that, if we hadn’t known better, she could have almost sounded like a very well record CD. This captivated the audience in a way rarely seen at the Tav, bringing almost all to a focussed silence.

While, for me, it did get a little musically same-y as the set went on that is a personal taste criticism and I seemed to be alone in this feeling.

A couple of well-chosen versions of songs previously done by Eva Cassidy later in the set brought the performance to a rousing close before the audience called Briggs back (in a slightly subdued way) for a final rendition of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah that had most of the room singing along and ended the night on a definite high and I would hope if Hattie makes a return to the island more venture out to hear her as I know a large number of people would enjoy her music and missed out.

You can see my photos of the show on the BBC Introducing Guernsey Facebook page

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BBC Introducing Guernsey: June 2017 – Arts Sunday Lookback

The Recks at Arts Sunday

The Recks at Arts Sunday

Click here to listen to the show

Earlier in the month BBC Introducing Guernsey held its third live event with a stage as part of Guernsey Arts Commission’s Arts Sunday event on the St Peter Port seafront (read the review of that event).

So for the June edition of the radio show I featured tracks recorded live on the day from Thee JeneratorsThe RecksTANTALEBuff Hudd and Blue Mountain (along with a little preview of Hummingbird, the new EP from the folk duo).

Not only that but we had music from a couple of bands playing national festivals; Of Empires who recently played The Isle Of Wight and Mt. Wolf who were playing at Glastonbury and we had a look ahead to next weekend’s Sark Folk Festival.

You can listen to the show on the BBC iPlayer by clicking here.

Tracklist

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BBC Introducing Guernsey: April 2017 – Elliot Falla in session and Vorlon

Elliot Falla and Vorlon Daz Carre

Elliot Falla and Vorlon

Click here to listen to the show

On the April 2017 edition of BBC Introducing Guernsey I featured a pair of guests spanning the range of guitar music in Guernsey.

Elliot Falla was in session with his brand of folk influence indie-blues including tracks from his recent Throne EP and brand new songs. He also told us not only about the making of the EP but also how its been expanding his gigging away from the island following regular shows in Brighton and London over the last few months.

Vorlon on the other hand is a project from long-standing heavy metal musician Daz Carre. He told us about his new album, intense extreme metal project False Sense of Security, as well as his time playing music in the islands which began in the mid-90s and has taken in bands such as Crunchy Frog, Earthcorpse, Darker Shores, Mechanical Lobster, Nemesis and more primarily as drummer but also playing bass and guitar.

You can listen to the show for the next 30 days through the BBC iPlayer Radio App or by clicking here.

I also announced that BBC Introducing Guernsey will again be going live as part of Arts Sunday, you can find out more about that here.

Tracklist

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BBC Introducing Guernsey: December 2016 – Review of the Year

BBC Introducing Guernsey 2016 sessions

Some of our sessions from 2016

Click here to listen to the show

To round off 2016 on BBC Introducing Guernsey I put together a show packed with some of the best music featured on the show across the year.

Featured were tracks from our regular acoustic sessions including Burning At Both EndsThe Secret SmilesClameur de Haro and more.

There were also album tracks and singles from The RecksOf EmpiresRobyn Sherwell and others as well as a look at some of the highlight artists from the summer festivals and a few brand new tracks as well.

You can listen to the show on the BBC iPlayer by clicking here or through the BBC iPlayer Radio App on mobile devices.

If you are making your own music you can upload it to BBC Introducing by clicking here

Tracklist

You can read my review of the year here

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Music in Guernsey – Review of the Year 2016

2016 has been another packed year for music in Guernsey and the Bailiwick. With more festivals than ever, events seemingly most nights of the week all year and many records released covering everything from acoustic folk to drum ‘n’ bass to heavy metal its fair to say the ‘scene’ is possibly the most varied it has ever been.

My review of the year was published in The Guernsey Press on Saturday 31st December 2016 and there’s a full version below.

Review of the Year 2016 press scan

2016 has been something of a landmark year for me with regards to Guernsey’s music scene as it marks ten years since I started reporting on music on the island. In that time countless bands have come and gone, some making massive waves others barely ripples, but it’s been very rare that any haven’t at least given it their all.

This level of enthusiasm from bands, DJs and any other performers can, I think, be credited with 2016 being the year when locally produced music seemed to most crossover into Guernsey’s mainstream public consciousness.

SugarSlam

SugarSlam

One of the ways I think this crossover has occurred has been with the recent proliferation of music festival and ‘all-dayers’, hitting a high of at least 10 across the past year ranging from the established and varied likes of the Vale Earth Fair and Liberation Day to more specific events like Chateau De Son and Smaashfest or charity based shows like Jonah Beats.

Jonah Beats set the bar high for these back in March with a day spanning everything from lo-fi folk to pounding drum ’n’ bass at the Vale Castle. Highlights on that day included Blakalska, SugarSlam, the return of The Swallows and a rare big stage appearance from Last Of The Light Brigade. The organisers also released a double CD compilation album to raise money for the Helping Jonah – Helping Others charity.

The summer festival season got going, as has become the standard, with the Chaos weekend. While the event has been bigger in the past, this year’s slightly scaled down show had something of the old atmosphere back.

PUNiK at Chaos

PUNiK

This was certainly helped by the presence of great visiting bands like Japanese punks PUNiK (who also released a fine debut album), Manchester noise-rock duo The Hyena Kill and experimental rock two piece Science Of Eight Limbs.

As well as the visitors Honest Crooks continued their run of great shows with a standout set in The Peace Tent that had everyone skanking as the sun set, while SugarSlam, Brunt and Static Alice stormed the War Stage across the weekend.

The Sark Folk Festival continued its run of great events with this year’s having less of the ‘us vs them’ atmosphere of traditional folk fans and those out for a fun weekend in a field.

Burg with Becky

Burg And The Back Porch Band

Musically there was a lot of good stuff on offer but it was the artists with their roots in the islands that really stood out for me. The highlight came from Burg & The Back Porch Band bringing some Americana to the spectacular teepee stage on the Saturday evening and invoking impressive singalong moments as well as creating one of the best atmospheres I can remember at a show in a long time.

Meanwhile Robert J. Hunter, The Space Pirates of Rocquaine, Buffalo Huddleston, Nessi Gomes and visitors Mad Dog Mcrea provided other choice moments.

New festival The Gathering took place at North Field in July and showcased a real variety of bands from the island. With three days it felt like almost every band with a slightly mainstream angle was featured on the main stage but it was the Friday and Sunday evening that brought the musical highlights for me with SugarSlam and Static Alice playing to a disappointingly small crowd on the opening night and Kings and Of Empires closing the show on Sunday on a real high.

Static Alice at The Gathering

Static Alice

Whether The Gathering becomes a regular part of the island’s festival calendar remains to be seen but as an event helping spread the word about the great talent in Guernsey to a wider audience it certainly did a good job.

The Vale Earth Fair this year certainly claimed its place as centrepiece of the island’s musical calendar as the Collective presented a year-long series of events celebrating its 40th anniversary.

The festival weekend itself was as big as its ever been with a series of gigs across the Friday and Saturday leading up to the main festival day.

Teaspoonriverneck at Vale Earth Fair

Teaspoonriverneck

Asian Dub Foundation were one of the biggest headliners the show’s ever seen but for me the highlights came with She Drew The Gun, a special appearance from Teaspoonriverneck, The Correspondents and Heads Off, though special mention has to go out to Honest Crooks and Buffalo Huddleston who, with earlier slots, did a great job of getting the festival atmosphere going much earlier than usually happens.

Along with the festival weekend the Collective staged an exhibition of photos and poster art chronicling the 40 years of the event which was a fascinating chance to chart some of the performers who’ve been there for the whole time and see how the event has evolved since its humble origins. The now annual Unplugged and John Peel tribute nights both provided some great moments, but it was the return of Pussycat And The Dirty Johnsons that was my Vale Earth Fair related highlight.

Away from the festivals there was of course plenty of other music going on, in fact I think its fair to say that with the exception of Sundays there seemed to be something musical happening every day of the year if you knew where to look.

For me though the highlights amongst all of this came in the form of the Sound Guernsey events for Guernsey’s youngsters. Showcasing a range of music they have grown from relatively humble intentions with shows at The Venue to fully fledged event gigs at The Fermain Tavern.

Honest Crooks at Sound Guernsey

Honest Crooks

Their summer party being a highlight of this as The Doomsday Project, Honest Crooks, Asylum Seekas and Blakalaska shared a stage with already impressive new comers Track Not Found and Equilibrium while their Christmas Party later in December gave was another great night.

When it comes to new bands a few have stood out. As well as the aforementioned Track Not Found, hardcore metallers Granite Wolf made an impressive debut in September developing on the likes of Brutus Stonefist and She Haunts The Roads and I very much look forward to hearing more of what they’ve got to offer.

The real stand out of the new crop though were Burning At Both Ends who have taken the fairly well trodden pop-punk template and breathed a new life and energy into it, winning over many fans with their tight live shows and impressive debut album.

Burning At Both Ends

Burning At Both Ends

As well as great music on the island, musicians continued to spread their wings further afield.

Along with two BBC Introducing showcases on BBC Radio 1 featuring 12 acts, a few stand outs emerged, Robyn Sherwell continued her rise with the release of her debut full length album to much acclaim back in April, including a UK tour and having one of her songs picked up for use on the trailer to Hollywood movie Suffragette.

Nessi Gomes also completed a hugely impressive crowdfunding campaign leading to the release of her debut album, Diamonds & Demons which was supported by a tour of the UK, Europe and the Middle East which will culminate with the official Guernsey album launch event next month.

Of Empires continued their march to becoming bona-fide rock ’n’ roll stars with support from all over the place including debuting new single Baby Darlin’ Sugar on BBC Radio 1 through BBC Introducing and picking up many nods as one of the UK bands to watch as we head into the new year and they prepare for the release of more music and a lot more gigs.

Robert J. Hunter

Robert J. Hunter

Meanwhile Robert J. Hunter continued gigging around London and the rest of the UK regularly, initially supporting his second album, Before The Dawn and then releasing his third, Where I’m From, though the Spiritual Records label a couple of weeks ago.

Plenty more records were released this year with Space Pirates of Rocquaine’s Vraic & Roll, Lord Vapour’s Mill Street Blues, Brunt’s Blackbeard and the aforementioned Burning At Both Ends all standing out, but it was a single, Drifting, from the duo of Flexagon and Buff Hudd that really seemed to take off, receiving much praise and also being picked up by Tom Robinson on BBC 6 Music.

As the year neared its end The Recks made something of surprise return with a new single and line up and they look set to make 2017 their year as they plan to finally unleash their long-awaited and much-anticipated debut album and in a standout live moment SugarSlam (yes, them again, they’ve had a great year) and Insurrection marked their 25th and 30th anniversaries respectively with an excellent night at the De La Rue.

Insurrection

Insurrection

It’s safe to say that 2016 has been an impressive year for music in Guernsey with a real variety of sounds and styles coming to the fore (beyond what’s mentioned here drum ’n’ bass and electronic music have had a real growth as well with Hard Riddims and Strategy gaining footholds as regular events) and opening up what could easily be a small and insular scene to a wide audience, and lets hope that continues with more people heading out to listen to new music around the island and there’s already some exciting sounding things coming up!

And a few particular highlights by category…

Band of the Year – Honest Crooks
Festival Stage/Event of the Year – Vale Earth Fair’s 40th Anniversary celebrations
Newcomers of the Year – Burning At Both Ends
Set of the Year – Burg & The Back Porch Band at Sark Folk Festival
Album of the YearRobert J. Hunter – Where I’m From
Visiting Band of the Year – PUNiK

You can listen to the BBC Introducing Guernsey review of the year radio show here

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BBC Introducing Guernsey: September 2016 – Citizen-X in session, Vale Earth Fair recap and autumn preview

Citizen-X on BBC Introducing Guernsey

Citizen-X in the studio

Click here to listen to the show

After a summer packed with festivals (I made it to four but there were plenty more) the September 2016 edition of BBC Introducing Guernsey looked back at the Vale Earth Fair’s 40th anniversary event while looking ahead to new music coming up as we move in autumn.

As well as that Citizen-X joined me for a live session and interview telling us about his unique approach to making music as well as playing this year’s Jersey Live festival along with The Peace Tent at Chaos and other events over the summer.

The show is available to listen to for 30 days through the BBC iPlayer Radio App or by clicking here.

Tracklist

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Channel Islands Pride: Guernsey – 10/09/16

The Space Pirates at Pride

The Space Pirates on stage in Market Square

A little over a decade ago I remember despairing, disbelieving and laughing with a kind of desperate hilarity as I recounted to my friends in the UK that a member of Guernsey’s government (a publicly elected Deputy, none the less) was being quoted in the local newspaper’s front page regarding his hugely ill-informed thoughts around gay people and AIDS – a choice quote being something along the lines of ‘We all know San Francisco’s a gay town and where AIDS comes from and we don’t want to be like that’… I think most people I know would love Guernsey to be more like San Francisco in all kinds of ways, but I digress.

Given that attitude was being given any kind of official credence just a short time ago made what took place on Saturday 10th September 2016 all the more impressive. Thousands gathered to take part in Guernsey’s first ever Pride event, organised by the Liberate organisation and following in the footsteps of 2015’s first Channel Islands Pride event in Jersey.

Having lived all but my university years on this little rock in the English Channel, this was my first proper pride event (a brief visit to West Hollywood Halloween in LA last year gave a bit of a taste though) and of course being in my ‘hometown’ made it all the more special.

Pride in Candie Gardens

People gather in Candie Gardens

The event itself began in Candie Gardens, a public garden that usually affords fabulous views of all the Channel Islands making it a particularly fitting place for the beginning of this island spanning event, but with the somewhat inclement weather conditions this view wasn’t at its best.

Despite that as the time for the parade/march neared people began to congregate at the top of the gardens where the Queerly Beloved Ceilidh Band and the Samba Burros drummers were doing their best at getting the atmosphere going.

Having seen some of the costumes at West Hollywood’s Halloween event last year and photos from Pride events around the UK I wondered quite how Guernsey’s often more (small c) conservative residents would mark the day, in terms of dress.

The weather somewhat forced the hand of many (including myself) so while there were flashes of rainbows and other significantly coloured flags many were partially covered by waterproofs, though the rainbow umbrellas from HSBC helped.

There there were a few though who cared not for the rain and were resplendent in various attires, proudly pinning their colours to the mast, along with a troupe of sailors and, of course, the spectacular Magenta who led the parade through town. (For the record I struck gold in discovering Progress Wrestling have a pride t-shirt amongst their merchandise so I managed to combine both my passion for pro-wrestling with the pride side of things).

The parade in the high street

The parade in the high street (Photo by Rebecca Catlow)

As we gathered at the top of the path that leads from Candie into the centre of St Peter Port the feeling of what this event meant really began to build. Certainly there was a party atmosphere with cheering, singing and laughing aplenty, but it was seeing and being part of this mass of people all present to make the same point that really struck me as something special.

I will admit that despite some fairly deeply held beliefs around both political and social issues this was my first time attending such an event of any description. The last few years have seen a growth in what, for Guernsey, passes as political protest or meaningful marching but often they seem to appear to be a few stragglers in a vast car park preaching entirely to a converted minority or heckling largely nonplussed politicians on the steps of the States Chambers, for the most part this felt a long way from that.

As the 50 metre rainbow flag passed over us and we began the parade down the hill into Smith Street and the High Street it was clear that not only were those in the parade there to celebrate, but that this was still to make a point to those who, maybe, were less aware of what it was all about and to shout loudly that old cliché about ‘being here’… though of course things are more complex than just that.

As we weaved our way down the streets some joined the parade while others clapped and cheered on from the footpaths. There were a few disapproving faces along the pavements – maybe they were just frustrated that their Saturday afternoon’s shopping was disrupted, maybe it was something more sinister, that’s not for me to judge, but they were few and far between which was very encouraging.

Magenta

Magenta

Upon reaching St Peter Port’s Market Square the samba drummers kept the atmosphere up before the afternoon’s compere, Tigger Blaize, took to the stage and introduced members of Liberate, some very happy sponsors and a few other official types to make their points about what this event was all about.

From there, after Magenta and ‘Colin from the Co-Op’ (he may sound like a cartoon character but is head of the main sponsor) dished out some raffle prizes the party really began. Buffalo Huddleston and The Space Pirates of Rocquaine, two of the island’s most popular bands, both put in great performances with what felt like an extra sense of enthusiasm given the nature of the event.

They were followed by Dolly Parton Tribute act Paula Randell who was good fun as expected and then Kitty Brucknell (an X-Factor contestant so I’m told but as you might expect that doesn’t mean a lot to me). Kitty was joined on stage by a pair of male dancers who were, to my knowledge, like nothing St Peter Port has ever seen (at least in quite such a public setting) and it felt somewhat incongruous seeing a chap dancing in a pair of very small trunks emblazoned with what looked like the logo of ‘Clonezone’ in this usually familiar setting – but equally that is, kind of, part of what this was all about.

At that point I bowed out for a nice Thai meal with friends while the ‘official’ party continued, no doubt very enthusiastically, later into the evening, but it was then and after, in reflecting that the importance of this event really struck me.

Buffalo Huddleston at pride

Buffalo Huddleston

Ever since it was announced that Channel Islands Pride was happening in Jersey last year I thought we should have a Guernsey counterpart. Then when that was announced there was no question in my mind that I would take part, at the very least, in the parade and of course enjoy the live music side.

That said, in the world of what Pride is championing, campaigning for and celebrating I couldn’t help but wonder, at times, if this was for me. While my Facebook profile lets my friends know certain of my preferences and I don’t go out of my way to hide anything, with a few exceptions I’ve never felt I’ve so publicly expressed this (keeping with my ongoing public presence the specifics of that I won’t detail for various reasons, mostly because its my business).

Walking through town then, being photographed by seemingly everyone with a smart phone, along with those from the ‘official’ media, did at points make me wonder what anyone who saw me there would think.

'Dolly Parton' at pride

‘Dolly Parton’ on stage

From there I could only figure that it doesn’t matter what they think, for one, and that all I’m doing, whatever my particular sexual orientation or position on the gender spectrum may be (lets be honest on the last note at least a big beard is a bit of a give away) I should be ‘proud’ of it, it shouldn’t be something that I feel (as I have at times) that I should be ashamed of or have to hide.

I know that still not everyone will understand all aspects of this, but that isn’t my problem. Along with this my presence there was to celebrate with my friends and family and their particular situations (varied as they are).

This then extrapolates out that no one, whatever their orientation or identity, should have to hide or feel anything but pride in it in 2016, whether they feel like shouting it from the nearest rooftop or not.

An event like this, while some may see as a small addition to an international movement, is as important (and potentially more so) than its larger more international counterparts as its finally publicly highlighting something that has so often been hidden within Guernsey’s community that, and I speak as a Guernseyman (as seems to be an important factor when making such statements), often doesn’t want to rock the boat or stand up and be seen.

My Progress pride shirt

My Progress pride shirt (for reference)

On top of that while the day was undeniably a celebration and a party it makes a huge statement of a political nature and, hopefully, directly to the island’s politicians, particularly in light of the upcoming debate around equal marriage law in the island, that this is a section of the island’s community that is bigger than they may believe, that has more support than they may believe and that above all is here and that no matter what some might try to argue is made up of all kinds of people from all sides of life.

Maybe this is an obvious statement, but its one that sometimes needs to be reaffirmed and can be easily overlooked, particularly given how recently it is that those in power had no idea about the subject at all, and what better way to do that than a big celebration that is open to anyone and everyone and brought some much-needed newness, colour and vibrancy to our little town.

As my Progress t-shirt proudly said #EveryoneWelcome – This. Is. Progress – and we finally seem to be making some – though there’s still more to do.

At this point I’d like to express my appreciation for the members of Liberate for all their hard work in making this event happen, they have suggested that for it to grow they need a lot more help so if you want to volunteer then give them a shout over on their Facebook page or where ever.

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BBC Introducing Guernsey: August 2016 – Clameur De Haro and Vale Earth Fair Preview

Clameur De Haro in the BBC Introducing Guernsey studio

Clameur De Haro in the BBC Introducing Guernsey studio

Click here to listen to the show

Summer festival season continues in full swing with this month’s BBC Introducing Guernsey radio show as I welcomed a band who’ve played all the big ones so far and I take a look ahead to the Vale Earth Fair’s 40th Anniversary.

Clameur de Haro have already played Chaos, Sark Folk Festival and The Gathering (amongst a lot of other gigs) this summer and still have Smaashfest and more to come. They joined me in the studio to have a chat and record a session of three of their own songs and one a pop-rock classic given their own unique ‘bluegrass’ treatment.

With the Vale Earth Fair marking its 40th birthday I looked ahead to the festival on Sunday 28th August with tracks for the likes of TeaspoonriverneckBuffalo HuddlestonFlexagon and more.

You can listen to the show by clicking here for 30 days after the first broadcast.

Tracklist

 

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BBC Guernsey Introducing: July 2016 – Chaos, Sark Folk Festival, The Gathering and more

Of Empires at The Gathering

Of Empires at The Gathering

Click here to listen to the show

With as many festivals as there were weeks in July 2016 the BBC Introducing Guernsey radio show for that month took a look back at three of them.

First was Chaos where I spoke to The Hyena Kill and we had music from them, PUNiKSugarSlamScience of Eight Limbs and HONEST CROOKS.

Then came Sark Folk Festival – I spoke to performer and organiser Claire Rakich and we also heard from Blue Mountains and organiser Josh De Kooker with extra music from Burg and The Space Pirates of Rocquaine.

Finally new festival The Gathering where I spoke to Static Alice and we heard brand new music from Of Empires.

You can listen to the show on the BBC iPlayer by clicking here.

Tracklist

Click here to listen to the show and as I’ve been nominated for an award for my work for BBC Introducing Guernsey you can vote for me here!

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